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How to Become a TV Host - Part 4

How to Become a TV Host – Part 4

In Part 1 of How To Become A Host we reviewed what it takes, the (3) T Core Values it takes to become a host.
-Think, Talk and Teach-

In Part 2 I broke it down to (3) Key Areas of connection every host needs to understand. TV Hosting is a Mind Mouth and Body Connection.

Part 3 continues with the importance of a “Mental Workout”.

Here is the final piece, Part 4:

TV_Host-Part-3

How to Become a TV Host – Part 3

In Part 1 of How To Become A Host we reviewed what it takes, the (3) T Core Values it takes to become a host.
-Think, Talk and Teach-

In Part 2 I broke it down to (3) Key Areas of connection every host needs to understand. TV Hosting is a Mind Mouth and Body Connection.

Here is Part 3:

TV_host

How to Become a TV Host, Part 2

In Part 1 of How To Become A Host we reviewed what it takes, the (3) T Core Values it takes to become a host.
-Think, Talk and Teach-

In this video I break it down to (3) Key Areas of connection every host needs to understand. TV Hosting is a Mind Mouth and Body Connection.

In Part 1 of How To Become A Host we reviewed what it takes, the (3) T Core Values it takes to become a host.
-Think, Talk and Teach-

In this video I break it down to (3) Key Areas of connection every host needs to understand. TV Hosting is a Mind Mouth and Body Connection.

As a host YOU are the product, YOU are the story. There are no actors, no props, just YOU.

So in essence the same amount of work that goes into a production a play or TV show should be the same amount of work that goes into training yourself to become the best host possible.

That includes owning your mind mouth and body connection. In this video we teach you how to accerlerate your thinking (mind) and train it so your thinking become sharper.

Increasing your capacity to tell great stories involves keeping your mind clutter free by preparing the story bullet points as well as keeping ahead of the story.

Comedians are great hosts because they are consistently ahead of the audience with their jokes and painstakingly rely on hitting their bullet points precisely.

This is the same challenge a hosts faces. So how can you get your mind in tip top shape to face these challenges?

First eating protien rich foods is important. Make sure before each audition you eat and drink alot of water. These two factors can make a huge difference.

Then for the next five days:

Practice = Reading Aloud

This simple technique is the secret sauce for all my top clients. This will improve:

  • Your Vocal and Verbal Power
  • Diction and Pacing
  • Vocal Stamina
  • Breathing
  • Thinking process
  • Story telling

This excercise is like swimming. It works out every muscle you need to build strength as a TV HOST. Its the best overall excercise you can do
for your On Camera Speaking Career.

The results are immediate. Use this today to make a difference in your on camera reads tomorrow.

For more information: iDalisMedia.com

iDalis Hosting

How to Become a TV Host, Part 1

How do you become a host..well that’s a loaded question.

The question really is – Do you have the basic technical and core values you will need to become a TV HOST?

What makes a great TV Host?

Do you have what it takes to become a TV HOST?

Are you an advanced HOST already on the air..and have lost you drive for your career?

You need THE 3 T’s! The three core technical skills and values you started with!

Think-Teach-Talk

  1. FAST THINKING SKILLS
  2. FAST TALKING SKILLS
  3. SLOW TEACHING METHOD

T-CORE VALUE #1 – Think

  • Thinking on your feet
  • Thinking and lifting text quickly
  • Thinking your career all the way through

Next Video Part 2: what can help you accelerate your thinking process.

T-CORE VALUE #2 – Talk

  • Passion to talk/ Curious mind
  • Verbal Mastery/Sound/ Lead Conversations

T-CORE VALUE #3 – Teach

  • Lead by teaching
  • Leader of the community

Stay tuned for How to become a TV HOST PART 2

Watch the video to get the skinny on all of this!

And please make a comment and let me know what you think!!

And…Who is your favorite TV HOST and why?

Hosting – Hosting Reels

Hosting Reels
by: Maureen Browne

Having a good reel is crucial to your hosting career. Good headshots and a strong resume will only get you so far. It’s your reel that Casting Directors use to determine whether or not they want to bring you in for an audition, or even better, a “general” meeting. I’ve cast several shows where I never held auditions – I only looked thru hosting reels to determine who I would then call in as a “callback.” Your reel is your calling card. If you don’t have one, make one!

Casting Directors have so much on their plates that they’ll determine in the first 15 – 30 seconds whether you’re right for their project or network. Yes, seconds! As a former Casting Executive at E! Entertainment Television and the Style Network, we’d receive hundreds of submissions, both in the mail and online. We’d devote time each week, ideally each day, to viewing the reels that came in so we could find the next Brooke Burke or Greg Kinnear. Thankfully we found Joel McHale.

Make sure you don’t waste these precious seconds with long montages. What’s a montage? Where you’re doing all kinds of fun stuff to show a casting director you’re daring or kooky. Don’t start out by saying your name five times either. We got it the first time. Put your strongest segments up front. Start with a good standup or two. Make sure it’s current footage of you, and we can easily identify who you are on your own reel. Are you the girl on the left or the right? If you’re the girl on the left, then don’t let the girl on the right do the talking on your reel.

Your reel should highlight your personality. It’ll make you different than the other hosts. And remember, it’s hosting and not acting. So be yourself.

Your reel doesn’t have to be long. Focus on quality rather than quantity. I’d rather see a good 1:30 reel than a mediocre 2:30 – 3:00 minute reel. A short reel may just be enough for me to call you in versus seeing too much and deciding against calling you in. Leave them wanting more!

I like interviews on a reel. You, your face, and even your body need to be in the shot so don’t just show a hand holding a microphone or the back of your head. Truth be told, most of us don’t really care about celebrities on your reel. Most people ask celebrities the same questions and the celebs have standard responses for them. There’s nothing too spontaneous about that. You can be even more creative doing a “man on the street” piece and you can show us your improv skills at the same time.

If you decide that you want to shoot your own footage, make sure the camera and sound quality are good and there’s proper lighting. And be creative. Think outside the box. Reels shot on Venice Beach, Hollywood Blvd. and in Times Square – they’ve been done hundreds of times. Show us something we haven’t seen before. Make it interesting so it sticks in our mind. But most importantly, show us what you’re passionate about so we can see who you really are as a host.

Hopefully you’ve found these tips helpful.

Hosts Tell All: Part 3

Breaking into hosting can be challenging and at times even downright frustrating. I’m sure you’ve all experienced it at one time or another and if you haven’t yet felt that way, you will. It’s all part of the process. In Part Three of ‘Hosts Tell All’ Jeannie Mai, Brian Corsetti and Lance Smith give aspiring hosts some more career advice and a little extra inspiration to keep handy on the journey to becoming a successful host.

Did you ever consider giving up hosting?

Jeannie and Brian say there hasn’t ever been a time they considered giving up hosting completely. They may go into other areas of hosting, but the love of hosting will always be there for them.

Have you ever made any mistakes along the way?

As well all know and hopefully come to accept — mistakes are inevitable. Any aspiring host will stumble on their journey. Lance even goes as far to say he has made every mistake there is to make. (Good to know!) However, both Lance and Brian believe the key to rebounding from a mistake is to learn from it. Lance feels the two biggest mistakes you can make as a host are to pigeonhole yourself and to get involved in a project that you don’t know enough about. He tells hosts to always make sure you know your product.

What sort of advice do you have for aspiring hosts?

First and foremost, Jeannie, Lance and Brian make it extremely clear that to be a successful host one has to remember is not always about them. A host is the reflection of everyone’s hard work and dedication to a project. Jeannie believes most everyone out there is working for themselves, so one way you can stand out as a host is to work for other people by offering them your services. Ask yourself, “How can I add my own zest to make this show better than the network imagined?” The perfect attitude in Jeannie’s opinion is one that reflects your selflessness, while at the same time showing that you are going to grow together as a team. Jeannie has a unique and positive motto… “if you’re stressed, find someone else to bless.” She feels that focusing your negative energy into a shelter, your community or even into a friend will help you grow as a person and as a host.

In this journey, it is essential to listen and be open to opportunities as they arise. Brian believes everyone has an opportunity, while Lance reminds us that you never know where you career is going to take you. However, most importantly Jeannie, Lance and Brian emphasize that the most crucial thing to remember about hosting is that “there is no other you.” They all celebrate the fact that no one, no matter how hard they try, can speak like you or look like you, so in the words of Jeannie, “Own that!” Lance is spot on by telling aspiring hosts that you’ll never be the next Ryan Seacrest or Giuliana Rancic, but instead you’ll be the first YOU. So, like Brian says jump in and go for it. If you want to be a host, don’t do it haphazardly. Hustle, know your craft, be a professional and above all else, be nice!

Many thanks to all three for this great advice.

Hosts Tell All: Part 2

There is no better way to discover the steps to becoming a host than to talk with hosts who have made it themselves. Brian Corsetti, Jeannie Mai, and Lance Smith break down the in’s and out’s of having representation, branding, and how they market themselves.

How important are your agent & manager?

Breaking into hosting can be extremely difficult and for a beginner it might seem the only way to become successful is to hire someone else to do the groundwork for them. However, Lance and Jeannie both explain that there never comes a time when you do not represent yourself even if you do have representation. Lance describes your relationship with your agent and manager as a team and you are “the quarterback.” Lance never finds himself sitting back and waiting on a phone call from his reps. In fact, he is the one calling his agent to pitch ideas and auditions! Jeannie even goes as far to say that when you are starting out that representation is not necessary. Her advice: “Promote and pitch the hell out of yourself!”

How much time do YOU personally commit to your career?

It is not surprising that host extraordinaire Jeannie Mai dedicates one hundred percent of her time to her career. However, Jeannie doesn’t think twice about the sacrifices she makes to have an amazing hosting career because she’s doing what she loves. Whether she is promoting designers on the red carpet, speaking at galas or dishing out fashion advice, Jeannie sees work as an ability to serve people and getting paid to do it is just a bonus.

What do you do when you felt things were slow in your career?

There will almost always be a time in your career when things are in a slump. However, when work is slow it shouldn’t give you an excuse to stop working out your “hosting muscles.” Brian believes that these slumps are necessary to reach your highest potential. He tells us these healthy pauses break us down and remind us what we need to do to get to the next level. But, he does admit that he usually has a ‘full on melt down’ before he begins to use this time to his advantage. The last time Brian was in between shows, he obtained his Real Estate license in order to be 110% at the next audition he walked into – it happened to be a show about homes. Lance, on the other hand, takes these slow times and makes himself the best host he can be by becoming more well-rounded and relatable by expanding his social circle. He tells hosts to go out and do something worthwhile; don’t get caught up in the mistake of only thinking “career, career, career.”

Brand VS. No Brand

Whether or not to have a brand is one of the largest debates in the hosting world and these three hosts are a testament to the differing opinions you can find when it comes to the idea of branding. Jeannie thinks that having a brand is absolutely, positively, essential! On the other hand, Lance and Brian are fairly opposed to the idea of branding yourself, especially when it comes to hosts that are just starting out. Despite these differing opinions, the three hosts do agree that you have to be yourself. When it comes down to it, they all emphasize that YOU are the brand, so don’t pretend to be something you’re not. Jeannie reminds hosts to “rock what’s unique about you” and Brian gives hosts a tip to remember “Don’t say you’re an expert when you’re not.” All summed up: Be YOU, do what you love and the brand will follow.

Hope you found this information helpful. Be sure to check back next month with the last installment of “Hosts Tell All.”

Hosts Tell All, Part 1

In this first part of “Hosts Tell All” I had a chance to sit down with Jeannie Mai, Brian Corsetti and Lance Smith, three hosts that I greatly admire. I had the pleasure of meeting Jeannie several years ago when I was casting for E! and Style. Jeannie recently told me she was living up in the Bay Area, yet drove down to LA whenever we called her in for an audition – which back then, was often. Who knew she ever drove so far… yet she always bounced into the room, full of personality and positivity. Her personality was infectious. I completely understand why Jeannie is so successful today.

I also met Brian Corsetti when he came in to audition at E! He’s like Jeannie – full of personality, had a great attitude and was a very solid host. And Lance Smith and I became friends first before I had ever had a chance to see him host. We immediately formed a connection and I found him to be really “down to earth.” A few months ago, I brought him in to audition for the CBS Primetime Gameshow that I was casting, “Secret Fortune”, and he really impressed me at how good he was. What these three hosts have in common is that they’re relatable, authentic and of course, great hosts. But they didn’t alway start off that way! Today they want to share their journey with you.

Jeannie has hosted for Extra, Character Fantasy and is currently the host of Emmy- nominated “How Do I Look?” on Style. She found her calling early in life, coming from a large Vietnamese family, and quickly made sure that not only her voice be heard, but also the voices of others in the family and then later – others in the world. Brian (Garage Mahal, Hollyscoop, The Great Ride) started out in radio and later became an account executive. He, by chance, got into hosting when he was describing to a client the type of host they needed for their project. Instead, the client decided to hire Brian. Lance started out acting (as many hosts do) and made the leap into hosting to expand his skillset. He later became the face of the CMT network for several years and is currently the host of TWC’s “Weathering Disaster.”

When I asked them what skills they needed for hosting, Jeannie’s immediate response was “an attitude of gratitude.” She acknowledges that you cannot make it in this industry by yourself and that you have to acknowledge every “moving part” that makes it all come to fruition. “Expect nothing and appreciate everything.” Jeannie also points out that you have to know how to be selfless and that it’s not about you. Lance said he quickly learned that he needed more than just acting skills and that hosting is about conveying an idea to an audience, making a connection, and keeping the audience with you the whole time. Brian realized that he not only needed to practice hosting skills (especially with the teleprompter!) but mostly that you must have confidence and not sweat the small stuff. I highly agree with all three of them.

What do they do when they have a bad audition? Brian’s advice is never to apologize but if you do have a bad audition, just gather up your dignity and leave the room. But learn from your mistakes and be sure not to make those mistakes again (because casting directors will remember!). Lance assures us that bad auditions happen to everyone — no matter where you are in the game. He says that he has probably had more bad auditions than good auditions and it should only make you want to keep trying. I’ve seen some very well-known hosts do poorly in auditions and then make excuses. I think they may have been overly confident in their skills, not have practiced and just think they could “wing it.” Lance also agrees that you have to learn from it, roll with it, but most importantly, don’t think it wasn’t you because it probably was.

Before they had agents, they all agree that they hustled to find jobs. They often found jobs through the regular channels — Actors Access and Craigslist as this was before the days of social media. Jeannie describes herself as being “hardcore” and would often hand deliver her submissions to make contacts. She believes that networking and building “real” connections with people landed her jobs. Brian went on blogs of subjects he had interest in and would often comment and start a conversation – another form of networking – which led to jobs. And when Lance first started hosting, he said jobs were pretty much word of mouth. But he also says that even when he secured an agent, he still had to be proactive in looking for jobs.

Make sure you come back next month when we feature Part Two of our three part series of “Hosts Tell All.”

MTT Hosting Reels, Part Two

In my previous article, I discussed some of the do’s and don’ts of hosting reels. In my video, “Hosting Reels Part Two” found at www.mastertalentteachers.com, I show you what I think is an example of a good hosting reel in its entirety. It’s from a great host, Brian Corsetti. Brian starts off with his name and get right into a couple solid standups. Even though his standups are short – about 7 seconds long – I can immediately see that Brian has good hosting skills.  His standups also vary – he goes from riding a motorcycle while delivering his standup to donning a tux on the red carpet doing an entertainment piece. Immediately I see his range and as a Casting Director, that’s important for me to see — especially if I may only watch the first 30 seconds of a reel.

Brian then goes on to include interviews mixing entertainment with construction and sports shows. Again, showing me his range and that he can host a variety of shows. He ends his reel with some outtakes and includes his contact info at the very end so if I want to call him in for an audition, I know how to reach him. Another thing that I highly recommend is putting your headshot on the front of your hosting reel label. Why? It does look more professional and but more importantly when I’m going thru a drawer of reels, I may see your face even if I’m not looking for your reel. It’s another way to get your face in the casting director’s mind.

When you’re just starting out, in order to get jobs, you have to have footage. You may ask how can you have footage if you haven’t gotten a job? Easy, you make it up. You’ll need to shoot segments of yourself (see my prior article on www.mastertalentteachers.com) in various hosting scenarios. You don’t want to shoot this yourself on a flip cam. It has to be a professional camera with professional sound quality. If not, it looks homemade.

When editing your reel, be careful because I often see logos of well-known networks and shows on reels that I know are made up segments.  As Matt Weinroth, co-owner of Open Door Productions, points out, you’d better be careful because if you have a Fox logo on your segment and you get called into Fox they’ll ask you what you did for them. And you’ll have to explain that you didn’t…  Casting Directors will call you out on this.  So don’t use familiar backdrops for your greenscreen like the E! News studio or Access Hollywood studio! If you add a logo to your segment, make sure it’s not distracting us from your read. Remember, you don’t want to take the focus off you!

Josh Chase, co-owner of Open Door Production, recommends going thru your footage yourself as you’re editing your reel. It also helps to have a friend review who is impartial to your footage. You want to make sure that your best reads are up front – even though you may not look your best (make sure you still look good though!). Your reel should be a collaboration with your editor because it’s your reel, so you want to make sure you’re happy with the finished product. But remember, your reel is always a work in progress. So when you get jobs along the way, you’ll take off some of the old footage and add new footage.

Your reel is not a vanity piece. As Weinroth says, “it’s not a trophy collection.” Put the newest and best up front and push the older stuff to the back.  Keep your reel to around two to three minutes. It’s about quality, not quantity. The footage on your reel should be recent (within a couple of years). We will definitely not be watching past the three minute mark and by that point we’ve seen too much and may decided NOT to call you in for an audition. You don’t want that to happen! I always say, “get in and get out and leave them wanting more.”

Hopefully that gives you more insight to your hosting reel. Check back to www.mastertalentteachers.com for upcoming videos and articles to assist you in becoming the best host you can be!

 

maureen

Hosting Reels

Having a good reel is crucial to your hosting career. Good headshots and a strong resume will only get you so far. It’s your reel that Casting Directors use to determine whether or not they want to bring you in for an audition, or even better, a “general” meeting. I’ve cast several shows where I never held auditions – I only looked thru hosting reels to determine who I would then call in as a “callback.” Your reel is your calling card. If you don’t have one, make one!

Casting Directors have so much on their plates that they’ll determine in the first 15 – 30 seconds whether you’re right for their project or network. Yes, seconds! As a former Casting Executive at E! Entertainment Television and the Style Network, we’d receive hundreds of submissions, both in the mail and online. We’d devote time each week, ideally each day, to viewing the reels that came in so we could find the next Brooke Burke or Greg Kinnear. Thankfully we found Joel McHale.

Make sure you don’t waste these precious seconds with long montages. What’s a montage? Where you’re doing all kinds of fun stuff to show a casting director you’re daring or kooky. Don’t start out by saying your name five times either. We got it the first time. Put your strongest segments up front. Start with a good standup or two. Make sure it’s current footage of you, and we can easily identify who you are on your own reel. Are you the girl on the left or the right? If you’re the girl on the left, then don’t let the girl on the right do the talking on your reel.

Your reel should highlight your personality. It’ll make you different than the other hosts. And remember, it’s hosting and not acting. So be yourself.

Your reel doesn’t have to be long. Focus on quality rather than quantity. I’d rather see a good 1:30 reel than a mediocre 2:30 – 3:00 minute reel. A short reel may just be enough for me to call you in versus seeing too much and deciding against calling you in. Leave them wanting more!

I like interviews on a reel. You, your face, and even your body need to be in the shot so don’t just show a hand holding a microphone or the back of your head. Truth be told, most of us don’t really care about celebrities on your reel. Most people ask celebrities the same questions and the celebs have standard responses for them. There’s nothing too spontaneous about that. You can be even more creative doing a “man on the street” piece and you can show us your improv skills at the same time.

If you decide that you want to shoot your own footage, make sure the camera and sound quality are good and there’s proper lighting. And be creative. Think outside the box. Reels shot on Venice Beach, Hollywood Blvd. and in Times Square – they’ve been done hundreds of times. Show us something we haven’t seen before. Make it interesting so it sticks in our mind. But most importantly, show us what you’re passionate about so we can see who you really are as a host.

Hopefully you’ve found these tips helpful.