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Conversation with Tiffany Maher pt 3

Conversation with Tiffany Maher, Part 3

Master Talent Teacher Joe Tremaine has a conversation with the recent LA transplant, Tiffany Maher, about her already blossoming dance career and the move to LA. Part 3 / 3

Tiffany Maher

Conversation with Tiffany Maher, Part 2

Master Talent Teacher Joe Tremaine has a conversation with the recent LA transplant, Tiffany Maher, about her already blossoming dance career and the move to LA.

Are You Equipped to Follow Your Dream?

by: Joe Tremaine

We all chase our Dreams!

Reach for our Dreams!

Dream our Dreams!

Hopefully REACH our Dreams! 

At any point in one’s career I think it is wise to take a long, hard, honest look at your career to determine your strengths and weaknesses.  What do you need to work on to become better equipped to follow your dream? 

In dance, are you weak in a particular genre or area?

In acting, are you weak in improv, scene study, etc.?

Make a list of your strengths and weaknesses.  Once you feel you have your list complete, then spend the most time working on your weaknesses – obviously! 

You must be totally honest with yourself in recognizing what your particular weaknesses are.  Your various teachers would/could certainly offer the best advice.  However, be cautious of getting too many people’s opinions.

Then, as you begin to turn each of your weaknesses into strengths, you will experience a satisfaction, a pride in your efforts, all of which will compel you to work more diligently than ever before! 

As your list shifts from the weakness side to the strength side:

  • You will become a more sale-able “product”!
  • You will become more SUCCE$$FUL!

Interview with GLEE Choreographer Zach Woodlee

The choreographer of the FOX hit series Glee, Zach Woodlee, sat down with Master Talent Teacher Joe Tremaine to discuss how his path led him from Texas to Los Angeles and on to become the choreographer of the insanely popular television series. Zach talks about what he looks for and expects from dancers when auditioning and hiring for Glee, and offers his advice to dancers in the entertainment industry.

Growing up with a mother who owned a dance studio, Zach’s childhood was immersed in dance. Later, after studying geriatrics in college, he worked with many area nursing homes to keep movement as the main focus of their recreational programs. However, fate would soon move him to Los Angeles in the pursuit of a dance career. Zach’s mornings began at 4:15 a.m., when he got up, put on all of his ballet gear and topped that with his barista uniform. His shift at Starbucks stretched from 5:15 a.m. until 10:15 a.m., which gave him just enough time to make it to his 10:30 ballet class, tearing off his apron and barista gear as he entered.

Zach got his first break dancing for LeAnn Rimes, then on to movies, joined SAG and began working union jobs. While dancing on tour with Madonna, the realization that an ongoing back condition would prevent him from dancing for much longer. He later made the transition into choreography. Zack=s Glee experience began with meeting show creator Ryan Murphy and realizing he had an innate understanding of the script. The pilot became a passion project for all those involved. Once they were satisfied it was packaged perfectly, they gave it to the world and the rest is history.

Regarding the dance industry, Zach reveals what he looks for and relies upon when casting dancers for Glee. Discussing the importance of keeping your photos and resumes updated, he emphasizes how your work ethic will inevitably make or break you. He also feels that younger dancers need to understand the importance of performing in a group, instead of just as a soloist with specialty tricks. Proper training and a technical background play an important role for him as a choreographer in creating the proper lines. He closes by saying that there is no reason to ever stop training or supporting your dance community. In his words,” If you don’t keep pushing yourself, you will become stale, and you will lose a little bit of your luster”.

Interview with Tiffany Maher

Conversation With Tiffany Maher, Part 1

Master Talent Teacher Joe Tremaine has a conversation with the recent LA transplant, Tiffany Maher, about her already blossoming dance career and the move to LA.

How to Work Your Way Up From the Bottom

by: Joe Tremaine

Being there!

Being in the mix!

Persistence!

People often ask me where I get my Choreographers, Teachers and Staff Members who have worked for me over the years.  My stock answer, “I raise them!” 

In thinking back, I realize that most of these people came to me repeatedly from city to city and thereby grew up attending Tremaine Dance Conventions, Intensives, Classes, etc. 

There are many, many young, talented individuals who come through “our doors,” but the question is – Who makes it?  Who are the ones that stand our and why? 

I see and notice the ones who are there – “in my face” consistently, all the while striving to be better than they were a moment ago.  Inhaling all the knowledge I’m giving them and immediately using it to push themselves further.  Certainly these performers must have Talent and Potential and a “Burning Desire” that bursts forth, but their persistence is what leads to their recognition.

One of my first assistants, Marcea Lane, was a young lady who was always there when I walked on stage to teach.  She was front and center – eager, excited and ‘turned out’! After many cities I finally said to her, “What the heck!? You’re always here! The next city why don’t you assist me?”  She did assist me for years, then taught for me and danced professionally for me.  She went on to have a great performing career including Michael Jackson’s “Thriller.”  She is now the Owner/CEO/Designer of her own hugely successful costume and activewear company – Marcea Activewear.  I’m so proud of her.

Joe Tremaine Interview with Dancer Tony Bellissimo

Master Dance Teacher Joe Tremaine sat down with first year professional dancer Tony Bellissimo, who was recently a dancer for Rihanna on The Loud Tour 2011, to discuss his move to Los Angeles, his experience on So You Think You Can Dance, auditioning for the Academy Awards, Glee and his advice for dancers who are moving toward a professional career.

Tony began dancing with his Mom when he was two, hip hop classes began at six, and at age 13, a discussion with Joe Tremaine convinced him of the need for technical classes such as ballet, jazz and tap.  By his senior year of high school, he had cut out varsity sports to focus exclusively on dance.  Then, at the age of 18, he found himself in the top 20 on season 5 of So You Think You Can Dance.  Even though he was the first to go home, his time spent on the sound stages of Los Angeles proved to be the catalyst he needed.  That January he made the move from frigid Buffalo, New York, to the warmth of Los Angeles.

Days after arriving in L.A., Tony’s first audition, and first professional job, was for the 82nd Annual Academy Awards, an audition process which he easily compares to his  SYTYCD experience.  Since that time, he has worked on other award shows including The Kids Choice Awards, the TV Land Awards and the Univision Awards.  He has also appeared on multiple episodes of Nick Jr’s The Fresh Beat Band and the Fox hit series Glee, including their “Thriller” themed episode which aired after the Super Bowl.  Other credits include Step Up 3D with director Jon M. Chu, a Radio Shack commercial and various music videos.

Based on his experience, Tony’s recommends pushing yourself outside your comfort zone so as not to limit yourself as a performer or your ability to compete with other dancers.  He discusses the need to be comfortable freestyling at auditions, saying, “Everyone in L.A. can dance.  It’s what you do after those two counts of eight that will set you apart.”  Tony’s other advice includes, the importance of communication with your agent, knowing and being confident in who you are as a dancer and the fact that you must eat, sleep and breathe dance if you want this as your career.